A Letter to Scotland: Rwandan opposition welcomes Scottish ‘No’ decision

The 'Better Together' supporters celebrate the result of the Scottish referendum on independence at the count centre for the Scottish referendum at Ingleston Hall on September 19, 2014 in Edinburgh, Scotland.
The ‘Better Together’ supporters celebrate the result of the Scottish referendum on independence at the count centre for the Scottish referendum at Ingleston Hall on September 19, 2014 in Edinburgh, Scotland.

On the 18th of September the Scottish People voted to remain in the United Kingdom. The Scottish people voted by 55 per cent to 45 per cent to stay in the United Kingdom. There was an impressive 85 per cent turnout. The result shows the Scottish people have clearly rejected independence from the United Kingdom.

The Rwandan People’s Party congratulates Scotland on the democratic, free and open way that it conducted the election. The Referendum on independence was watched by many in the world with great interest. There are lessons in the Scottish vote on Independence for the globe. Scotland and England were united and became one kingdom in 1707. In that year the Scottish Parliament merged with the English Parliament to create the current British Parliament.  Over the following centuries Scotland and England have remained united in peace and war.

Since the late nineteenth century there has been a growing desire among a minority of Scots for independence. In the 1980s the Scot’s became increasingly alienated from the British Government. They were especially angered over London’s use of revenues from oil in the North Sea. In response the New Labour government granted more powers to Scotland and established a new Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh. Scottish nationalists were still not satisfied and lobbied for a referendum on full independence from England.

The various attempts by London governments did not end some Scot’s desire for independence, but rather increased their wish to break the link with England. The London’s governments’ attempts to ensure that Scotland did not become independent encouraged some Scots seek independence more. The Scottish people have demonstrated several things during the course of the Independence Referendum. Firstly, that politics is still important. Increasingly, people, especially young people have no interest in politics.

This was not the case with Scotland, where nearly all of the population participated in the debate and voted. The Referendum in Scotland showed that it is still possible to have a serious political debate. Today too many people are not interested in serious matters. This is especially the case with young people who are only interested in superficial things such as video games and celebrities. The Scottish Referendum showed that people are still willing and eager to become engaged in serious political discussions.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

* Copy This Password *

* Type Or Paste Password Here *

388,449 Spam Comments Blocked so far by Spam Free Wordpress

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>