Call to give Nkurunziza one-year extension to avoid civil war

Brundians stoning police in Bujumbura after Nkurunziza's party announced they had chosen him to run for a third term.
Burundians stoning police in Bujumbura after Nkurunziza’s party chose him to run for a third term.

By Nkonge I Kaggwa – Kampala, Uganda

Former Burundian renegade Brigadier General Ndayambaje Jean Marie has advised Burundians to grant their President, Pierre Nkurunziza a one year extension to enable the country establish a “A truth and Reconciliation Commission” that would in turn sort out the problems of the Burundian people.

Speaking to The London Evening Post (The LEP) on phone from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Gen Ndayambaje said President Nkurunziza had made some political, social and economic landmarks for the people which would be destroyed in case he insisted to stick to the presidency. This comes after violence broke out in the country when civilians challenged Nkurunziza’s declaration to seek a third term of office. He further called for calm in Bujumbura where violence has been escalating and is now believed to have claimed the lives of 21 civilians, four policemen and one soldier.

Gen Ndayambaje warned that what is happening in Burundi needs to be addressed before it generates into genocide. “What we see from here is typical genocide between the Tutsi and Hutus now. We need to look above such issues and we say this is a constitutional matter that needs to be addressed,” he told The LEP. Ndayambaje who early this year disclosed to The LEP his intension to stand for the Burundian presidency come June 2015, acknowledged that demonstrators hurried to take to the streets since the country’s electoral commission has not yet declared President Nkurunziza a potential presidential candidate.

11 thoughts on “Call to give Nkurunziza one-year extension to avoid civil war

  • May 3, 2015 at 1:38 pm
    Permalink

    It has been more than 40 years since most African countries became independent. However, no African country has succeeded in these decades to bring about freedom, peace and prosperity. Every single promise by post-colonial African leaders and freedom fighters has been broken.

    Attempts are made everyday by the same people who changed this or that government yesterday to create a new government but end up doing exactly the same they are blaming this or that government for. In essence, governments and oppositions in Africa are the same and one. The only difference is that they both have different levels of lying to the people.

    The question I am asking and will attempt to answer in the future is this: “Is it necessary to change governments in Africa when the results will always be the same?” I will focus on Uganda starting from 1962 the time we got independence to the present. It is troubling to see that every Ugandan leader Obote I and II, Amin, Lule, Binaisa, Okello & Okello and Museveni have all failed to lead Ugandans to the promised land. What is troubling is that the promised land is within and Ugandans do not need to travel any distance to reach it, unlike the Jewish people who had to travel from Egypt to Palestine.

    Reply
    • May 3, 2015 at 10:34 pm
      Permalink

      Mr Oryema.
      I read your narrative with interest but a difference on one-liner issue “… difference is that they both have different levels of lying to the people…”
      My take on the individuals you have identified who occupied and occupy the Chair of ‘PRESIDENT’ are as follows:
      a. This chair is the top chair and there is no other above it.
      b. The structure of governance is such that the occupant of that chair is enjoys the ‘MAXIMUM BENEFIT OF THE DOUBT’ i.e. can authorise lies, can authorise death,etc., in short can virtually get away with anything.

      My request to you is challenge the points above and suggest the sort of structure for the nationalities to adopt that will restrain even ‘President Oryema Johnson’ to function and enjoy the impunity that, that Chair offers.

      ‘President’ Oryema Johnson, please stand up, look at the nationalities in the ‘eye’ and truthfully tell them that when they offer you the ‘BENEFIT OF THE DOUBT’ you will ‘NOT ACCEPT’ it.
      Opoya

      Reply
      • May 4, 2015 at 5:05 pm
        Permalink

        Ladit Opoya,

        Thank you for your response and the challenge. I love challenges particularly when they deal with national issues that are closer to my heart; building sustainable political and social economic system in Uganda and by extension to our neighbors in the North, South, West and East. Peace in the neighborhood matters as much as it does in one’s own home/house.

        The issue of different levels of lying can be answered in the following way. It always begins with good intention but along the way things that were not thought about start to happen. Obote I had good intention but took the Kingdom of Buganda, the only one he forged alliance with out of the others, for granted. The fall out with Sir Edward Mutesa was the beginning of Dr. Apollo Obote’s deception. He got away with it from 1966 to 1971.

        Then came Amin in 1971. While his coming to power was purely to save his own skin because Obote had ordered his arrest,he was taken for granted and considered a savior of some sort particularly by the Buganda establishment. His deception started a little later even though opposition to his regime started immediately after January 25th 1971. Amin’s deception came in the form of brutality. Believed that through force he could contain the opposition. But the more brutality he applied, the stronger the opposition to him became. The danger of this, was that everything and all attention was focused on him, believing that once he was removed, Uganda would become peaceful. What a mistake it was!

        UNLA/UNLF was the biggest fiasco Uganda has ever had for introduced the worst form of deception in Uganda’s history since independence. More will come as I want to keep my response shorter order to be able to address your question and others that will follow. I would like us systematically address Uganda’s issue in a way that leads to the formation of a common ground on which the future can be built without deception.

        Reply
  • May 8, 2015 at 12:21 pm
    Permalink

    After 50 years of political independence, it is clear that Africans cannot hold free and fair elections. Holding elections in Africa means declaration of war on innocent people. Therefore, there is no reason to hold them when more people than the ballots are going to be killed. One thing is very clear that once a dictator has stayed in power for more than a decade, trying to remove them either by force or rigged ballots is extremely costly. Reason is simple, they spend those years not building the country’s political system, but structuring personal power from bottom up. The army, police, prisons and other organs of government all become personal. If Africans plan to change governments and the only way of doing so is through force it is important to start doing so immediately not wait until 30 years later. For example, of what benefit removing Museveni by force now. My recommendation therefore, is, as long as there is room for the private sector to function, Africans should forget politics. Focus on building the economy and create your own base. After all, the world now is a global village, you do business anywhere anytime. Forget bogus, rigged and corrupt elections.

    Reply
  • May 12, 2015 at 3:12 am
    Permalink

    President Oryema
    “….‘President’ Oryema Johnson, please stand up, look at the nationalities in the ‘eye’ and truthfully tell them that when they offer you the ‘BENEFIT OF THE DOUBT’ you will ‘NOT ACCEPT’ it…..”

    Still Waiting

    Opoya

    Reply
  • May 16, 2015 at 12:12 pm
    Permalink

    Ladit Opoya, you yet have to define what you mean by “benefit of the doubt”. Very rarely, does the general population lets a leader of great vision and a well defined economic agenda and how to get to their final destination down. But leaders are well known for letting the general population down for many reasons. In a fragmented society such as Uganda that is built on tribal allegiance, a leader with a weak personality cannot manage his own vision, because in the end, what began as a national vision becomes a tribal gate away to riches through corruption and patronage.
    Africans, though claiming to be part of modern society that is built on nationalism have not left their tribal nest.

    When a Ugandan meets a fellow Ugandan in London for example, the first question is “Gang megi tye kwene” (where is home for you). That means Uganda is not home, but a village in Kotido is. As soon as you define what you mean by benefit of the doubt, I will elaborate my position.

    Reply
  • June 4, 2015 at 2:55 am
    Permalink

    Your potential Excellency Oryema
    I quote but one verification defining ‘Benefit of the doubt: “But leaders are well known for letting the general population down for many reasons”.
    My quip: The nationalities are MORE THAN AWARE that the above quote is the outcome of delegating the function to the “visionary’ leaders yearning to superintend over their affairs yet extend the credit line that one might come good.
    All am asking is that since this is the expected outcome are you going to refuse the credit line to superintend over the affairs of the habitat if extended?
    Opoya

    Reply
  • June 5, 2015 at 12:15 pm
    Permalink

    Ladit Opoya,

    There is a reason not only in politics, but other fields as well why “the benefit of the doubt exists”. This is more prominent in none democratic countries where past leaders have broken every promise they made. This has created an environment in which both the ruled and rulers no longer trust each other. However, regardless of previous past broken promises and hearts, citizens still have some faint faith in those who emerge as leaders to lead them to the promised land which they did not reach previously. To answer you directly, yes, should the people give me the benefit of the doubt, I will give them mine too in the hope I will deliver what I promise. The best way to succeed is not to promise too much and also not to blame the previous leaders for everything that went wrong. It is best to learn from it, than blaming it in the hope that you can improve and not try to re-invent the wheel. There is no need to do that because both time and limited resources may not permit that.

    Reply
  • June 5, 2015 at 11:09 pm
    Permalink

    Potential Excellency
    Thanks for the quoted template. As an aspirant, let me say at the onset, I wish you well on that journey, but unfortunately, will not be following that ‘BUS’

    “….This has created an environment in which both the ruled and rulers no longer trust each other…”.

    “…The best way to succeed is not to promise too much and also not to blame the previous leaders for everything that went wrong. It is best to learn from it, than blaming it in the hope that you can improve and not try to re-invent the wheel. There is no need to do that because both time and limited resources may not permit that…”

    You will ask WHY?? Well the majority of the ‘opinion makers’ and ‘opinion leaders’ use that template; as day follows night.
    Opoya

    .

    Reply
    • June 6, 2015 at 10:27 am
      Permalink

      Ladit Opoya,

      Unless it is an express bus, not every passenger goes to the same destination. My bus is heading to Arua from Kampala which is not your final destination. Since it is a milk run bus stopping at every trading center along the way, you dropped off in Bombo where it stopped to pick up more passengers. Regardless of your short distance, we will always give you a ride to any destination in Uganda, after all our bus is colorless and has no party affiliation. It is a “People’s bus, owned by the people and driven by the people”. Any time, we say “Karibu ndugu”.( Welcome brother).

      Reply
  • June 8, 2015 at 11:22 pm
    Permalink

    Potential Oryema
    Thanks for the invite but I can put both my hands up in the air, that let that “People’s bus, owned by the people and driven by the people” pass by simply because the esteemed authors of that august statement too were the penultimate opinion makers who designed and painted the colours of that bus, and designed the programme for the BUS ‘derevas’ (sp) and hold the licencing rights to both the BUS and the rights to ‘deriva’ (sp) it wherever it is going.

    As it were, since, in context of the Afrika habitat, every previous, current and ‘potential’ bus ‘dereva’ , paid, has paid and will pay lip service to that statement, yet go on, and will go on to privatise the very delegated authority to extended to them by the nationalities to manage the affairs of the habitat. Uhhmm!! The nationalities will always remain alienated as the college of privateers enjoy the outcomes of delegated authority and functions, however I suspect they (the nationalities that is) are and will restlessly continue to search for new opinion makers to shape new leaders who pay some attention of wanting out of that ‘phraseology and attendant designer ‘bus’

    Anyways!!, since you agreed that ‘you will accept the benefit of the doubt’ with some modification to the licencing rights to take the bus in the direction of your choosing and admit passengers according to your criterion. You will not be short of passengers who will grow into potential ‘derevas’ (sp) to take turns to ‘deriva’ (sp) the bus.
    Let me say BEST OF LUCK.
    Greetings
    Opoya

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

* Copy This Password *

* Type Or Paste Password Here *

336,453 Spam Comments Blocked so far by Spam Free Wordpress

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>